Home 3d Printing Printed and Flexible Electronics for Automotive Applications 2021-2031: Technologies and Markets: IDTechEx

Printed and Flexible Electronics for Automotive Applications 2021-2031: Technologies and Markets: IDTechEx

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1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.1. Printed/flexible/organic electronics market 1.2. Printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications. 1.3. Transitions in the automotive industry 1.4. Advantages of roll-to-roll (R2R) manufacturing 1.5. What is flexible hybrid electronics (FHE)? 1.6. Automotive-relevant attributes of FHE 1.7. Printed/flexible electronics in vehicle powertrains. 1.8. Battery thermal management: Optimal temperature required 1.9. Integrated pressure/temperature sensors and heaters for battery cells 1.10. Technological/commercial readiness level of printed/flexible electronics in vehicle powertrains 1.11. Vehicle interiors increasingly provide differentiation 1.12. Printed/flexible electronics for vehicle interiors 1.13. Printed/flexible electronics opportunities from car interior trends 1.14. Printed/flexible electronics enables cost differentiation and/or cost reduction 1.15. Integrated stretchable pressure sensors 1.16. Innovative integration of capacitive touch screens 1.17. Hybrid piezoresistive/capacitive sensors 1.18. Metallization and materials for each 3D electronics methodology 1.19. Motivation for 3D electronics 1.20. In-mold electronics: Summary 1.21. Printed/flexible electronics in automotive displays and lighting 1.22. Technological/commercial readiness level of printed/flexible electronics in vehicle interiors 1.23. Printed/flexible electronics for vehicle exteriors 1.24. SWIR for autonomous mobility and ADAS 1.25. Transparent electronics for ADAS radar 1.26. Opportunities for printed/flexible electronics in exterior automotive lighting 1.27. Transparent heaters for exterior lighting/sensors/windows 1.28. Where are printed/flexible photovoltaics envisaged in cars? 1.29. Technological/commercial readiness level of printed/flexible electronics in vehicle exteriors 1.30. Global car market forecast by powertrain 1.31. Overall forecast: Printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications (volume) 1.32. Overall forecast for printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications (volume) (data table) 1.33. Overall forecast: Printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications (revenue) 1.34. Overall forecast for printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications (revenue) (data table) 1.35. Forecast revenue CAGR 2021-2031 2. INTRODUCTION 2.1.1. Printed/flexible/organic electronics market 2.1.2. Description and analysis of the main technology components of printed, flexible and organic electronics 2.1.3. Market potential and profitability 2.1.4. Printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications. 2.1.5. Transitions in the automotive industry 2.1.6. Trends in automotive powertrain adoption 2.1.7. Trends in autonomous vehicle adoption 2.1.8. What are the levels of automation in cars? 2.1.9. Opportunities for printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications 2.1.10. Advantages of roll-to-roll (R2R) manufacturing 2.1.11. Flexible hybrid electronic (FHE) circuits for automotive applications 2.1.12. What is flexible hybrid electronics (FHE)? 2.1.13. What counts as FHE? 2.1.14. FHE: The best of both worlds? 2.1.15. Overcoming the flexibility/functionality compromise 2.1.16. Commonality with other electronics methodologies 2.1.17. Automotive-relevant attributes of FHE 2.1.18. PCB replacement with FHE circuits 2.2. Overall market forecasts 2.2.1. Forecasting methodology 2.2.2. Forecast: Global car market by powertrain 2.2.3. Forecast: Global autonomous car market 2.2.4. Forecast: Global autonomous car market (data table) 2.2.5. Overall forecast: Printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications (volume) 2.2.6. Overall forecast: Printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications (volume) (data table) 2.2.7. Overall forecast: Printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications (revenue) 2.2.8. Overall forecast: Printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications (revenue) (data table) 2.2.9. Forecast revenue CAGR 2021-2031 2.2.10. Forecast: Flexible hybrid electronics (FHE) 2.2.11. Forecast: Flexible hybrid electronics (data table) 2.2.12. Forecast: Printed sensors and heaters for batteries 2.2.13. Forecast: TIMs for electric vehicles 2.2.14. Forecast: TIMs for electric vehicles (data table) 2.2.15. Forecast: HMI technologies 2.2.16. Forecast: HMI technologies (data table) 2.2.17. Forecast: OLED displays 2.2.18. Forecast: OLED displays (data table) 2.2.19. Forecast: IME /FIM/Electronics on 3D surfaces 2.2.20. Forecast: IME/FIM/Electronics on 3D surfaces (data table) 2.2.21. Forecast: Printed heaters for seats and interior (data table) 2.2.22. Forecast: Exterior applications of printed/flexible electronics 3. PRINTED/FLEXIBLE ELECTRONICS IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE POWERTRAINS 3.1.1. Printed/flexible electronics in electric vehicles 3.2. Battery monitoring/heating for electric vehicles 3.2.1. Introduction to thermal management for electric vehicles 3.2.2. Battery thermal management: Optimal temperature required 3.2.3. Integrated battery temperature sensing and heating: IEE 3.2.4. Printed battery module heater: IEE 3.2.5. Silicon nanoparticle ink for temperature sensing (PST Sensors) (II) 3.2.6. Printed temperature sensors and heaters 3.2.7. InnovationLab: Integrated pressure/temperature sensors and heaters for battery cells 3.2.8. SWOT: Temperature control (sensing/heating) for battery systems 3.2.9. Temperature control (sensing/heating) for battery systems 3.3. Thermal interface materials for electric vehicle powertrains 3.3.1. Thermal management materials (TIMs) in automotive applications 3.3.2. Thermal management – pack and module overview 3.3.3. Why use TIM in power modules? 3.3.4. Automotive applications are a harsh environment 3.3.5. Thermal greases are still the norm 3.3.6. Thermal management of Electronic Control Units (ECUs) 3.3.7. Alternatives TIMs: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) 3.3.8. Carbon nanotubes for TIMs: Stanford University 3.3.9. Thermoelectric Coolers and Generators 3.3.10. Thermoelectric coolers and generators 3.3.11. SWOT: Thermal management materials 3.3.12. Thermal management and thermal interface materials 3.4. Summary: Printed/flexible electronics in electric vehicle powertrains 3.4.1. Technological/commercial readiness level of printed/flexible electronics in vehicle powertrains 3.4.2. Forecast: Printed sensors and heaters for batteries 3.4.3. Forecast: TIMs for electric vehicles 3.4.4. Forecast: TIMs for electric vehicles (data table) 4. PRINTED/FLEXIBLE ELECTRONICS IN VEHICLE INTERIORS 4.1.1. Vehicle interiors increasingly provide differentiation 4.1.2. Printed / flexible electronics in car interiors 4.1.3. Evolution of car interiors: 1950s – 1980s 4.1.4. Evolution of car interiors: 1990s – today 4.1.5. Evolution of car interiors: today – future 4.1.6. Printed/flexible electronics opportunities from car interior trends 4.1.7. Printed/flexible electronics enables cost differentiation and/or cost reduction 4.2. Human machine interface (HMI) technologies 4.2.1. Company profiles: HMI Sensors 4.2.2. Piezoresistive sensors 4.2.3. Printed piezoresistive sensors: An introduction 4.2.4. Automotive applications for printed piezoresistive sensors 4.2.5. Automotive seat occupancy sensors 4.2.6. What are force sensing resistors (FSR)? 4.2.7. What is piezoresistance? 4.2.8. Percolation dependent resistance 4.2.9. Thru-mode sensors 4.2.10. Shunt mode sensors 4.2.11. Force vs resistance characteristics 4.2.12. Piezoresistive inks for force sensitive resistors 4.2.13. Complete material portfolio approach is common 4.2.14. IEE: Seat occupancy sensors 4.2.15. ForcIOT: Integrated stretchable pressure sensors 4.2.16. Tangio: 3D multi-touch pressure sensors 4.2.17. Tekscan: Matrix pressure sensor architecture 4.2.18. Piezoresistive sensors in car seats 4.2.19. InnovationLab: Spatially resolved flexible pressure sensor 4.2.20. Technological development of piezoresistive sensors. 4.2.21. Business models for printed piezoresistive sensors 4.2.22. SWOT: Piezoresistive sensors 4.2.23. Capacitive sensors 4.2.24. Capacitive sensors: Working principle 4.2.25. TG0: Integrated capacitive sensing 4.2.26. Rotary dial on a capacitive touch screen 4.2.27. Conductive materials for transparent capacitive sensors 4.2.28. Quantitative benchmarking of different TCF technologies 4.2.29. Technology comparison 4.2.30. Silver nanowires: An introduction 4.2.31. Properties of silver nanowires 4.2.32. Combining AgNW and CNTs for a TCF material (Chasm) 4.2.33. Metal mesh: Photolithography followed by etching 4.2.34. Direct printed metal mesh transparent conductive films: performance 4.2.35. Direct printed metal mesh transparent conductive films: major shortcomings 4.2.36. Introduction to Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) 4.2.37. Carbon nanotube transparent conductive films: performance of commercial films on the market 4.2.38. Carbon nanotube transparent conductive films: mechanical flexibility 4.2.39. PEDOT:PSS 4.2.40. Performance of PEDOT:PSS has drastically improved 4.2.41. Use case examples of PEDOT:PSS TCF for capacitive touch sensors 4.2.42. SWOT: Printed/flexible capacitive sensors 4.2.43. Hybrid piezoresistive/capacitive sensors 4.2.44. Tangio: Hybrid FSR/capacitive sensors 4.2.45. Curved sensors with consistent zero (Tacterion) 4.2.46. Tacterion: Flexible combined force/capacitive sensing 4.2.47. Summary: Printed piezoresistive sensor applications 4.2.48. SWOT: Hybrid piezoresistive / capacitive sensors 4.2.49. Piezoelectric sensors 4.2.50. Piezoelectric sensors: An introduction 4.2.51. Printed piezoelectric sensor 4.2.52. Piezoelectric polymers 4.2.53. PVDF-based polymer options for sensing and haptic actuators 4.2.54. Piezoelectric polymers sensors: Pyzoflex 4.2.55. Meggitt: Inorganic piezoelectric inks 4.2.56. SWOT: Piezoelectric sensors 4.3. Printed/flexible interior heaters 4.3.1. Printed car seat heaters 4.3.2. Car seat heaters 4.3.3. Graphene inks are a potential substitute? 4.3.4. Transparent circuits as car interior heaters 4.3.5. Transparent circuits as car interior heaters (continued) 4.3.6. Company profiles: Printed/flexible interior heaters 4.3.7. SWOT: Printed/flexible interior heaters 4.4. Emerging manufacturing methodologies for integrating electronics 4.4.1. Metallization and materials for each 3D electronics methodology 4.4.2. 3D electronics manufacturing method flowchart 4.4.3. HMI: Trend towards 3D touch surfaces 4.4.4. Company profiles: Emerging manufacturing methodologies 4.4.5. Printing electronics onto 3D surfaces 4.4.6. 3D electronics requires special electronic design software 4.4.7. Advantages of 3D electronics vs conventional PCBs 4.4.8. Motivation for 3D electronics 4.4.9. Comparing selective metallization methods 4.4.10. Aerosol deposition onto 3D surfaces 4.4.11. Replacing wiring bundles with printed electronics 4.4.12. Comparison of metallization methods 4.4.13. SWOT: Electronics onto 3D surfaces 4.4.14. Summary: Electronics onto 3D surfaces 4.4.15. In-mold electronics (IME) and film-insert molding (FIM) 4.4.16. In-mold electronics: Summary 4.4.17. Manufacturing in-mold electronics (IME)? 4.4.18. What is the in-mold electronic process? 4.4.19. Motivation for IME in automotive applications 4.4.20. In-mold electronic application: Automotive 4.4.21. Addressable market in vehicle interiors in 2020 and 2025 4.4.22. Automotive: In-mold decoration product examples 4.4.23. Case study: Ford and T-ink 4.4.24. Automotive: Human machine interfaces 4.4.25. Stretchable conductive inks for in-mold electronics 4.4.26. In-mold conductive inks on the market 4.4.27. Printed and thermoformed overhead console 4.4.28. Covestro: Plastics for IME 4.4.29. Plastic Electronic: Film insert molding 4.4.30. PolyIC: Film insert molding 4.4.31. Molex: Capacitive touch panel with backlighting 4.4.32. SWOT: In-mold electronics (IME) and film-insert molding (FIM) 4.5. Interior displays and lighting 4.5.1. Mercedes-Benz: 3 screens mounted collectively 4.5.2. Increased adoption of large displays and lighting 4.5.3. Company profiles: Interior displays and lighting 4.5.4. OLED and flexible displays 4.5.5. OLED displays for automotive applications 4.5.6. Where are OLED displays used in automotive applications? 4.5.7. Visteon: Curved screens in automotive interiors 4.5.8. ROYOLE: Flexible OLED displays for gauge clusters 4.5.9. Passive-matrix OLEDs 4.5.10. Active matrix OLED in automotive applications 4.5.11. Transparent OLED for heads-up displays 4.5.12. Flexible LCD displays 4.5.13. SWOT: OLED and flexible displays 4.5.14. Emerging display and lighting technologies for automotive interiors 4.5.15. Printed/flexible electronics in automotive displays and lighting 4.5.16. Micro-LED in automotive displays 4.5.17. Comparisons of LEDs for displays 4.5.18. Integrating lighting and e-textiles 4.5.19. Printed LED lighting (NthDegree) 4.5.20. SWOT: Emerging display and lighting technologies 4.6. Summary: Printed/flexible electronics in vehicle interiors 4.6.1. Summary: Printed/flexible electronics in vehicle interiors 4.6.2. Technological/commercial readiness level of printed/flexible electronics in vehicle interiors 4.6.3. Forecast: HMI technologies 4.6.4. Forecasts: HMI technologies (data table) 4.6.5. Forecast: OLED displays 4.6.6. Forecasts: OLED displays (data table) 4.6.7. Forecast: IME /FIM/Electronics on 3D surfaces 4.6.8. Forecast: IME/FIM/Electronics on 3D surfaces (data table) 4.6.9. Forecast: Printed heaters for seats and interior (data table) 5. PRINTED/FLEXIBLE ELECTRONICS IN VEHICLE EXTERIORS 5.1.1. Printed/flexible electronics in vehicle exteriors 5.2. Hybrid SWIR image sensors 5.2.1. SWIR for autonomous mobility and ADAS 5.2.2. Other SWIR benefits: Better hazard detection 5.2.3. Types of printed photodetectors/image sensors 5.2.4. SWIR: Incumbent and emerging technology options 5.2.5. Existing long wavelength detection: InGaAs 5.2.6. OPD on CMOS hybrid image sensors 5.2.7. Fraunhofer FEP: SWIR OPD-on-CMOS sensors 5.2.8. Quantum dots as optical sensor materials 5.2.9. Hybrid quantum dots for SWIR imaging 5.2.10. QD-Si hybrid image sensors: Reducing thickness 5.2.11. QD-Si hybrid image sensors: Low power and high sensitivity to structured light detection for machine vision? 5.2.12. Advantage of solution processing: Ease of integration with a silicon ROIC 5.2.13. Quantum dot films: Processing challenges 5.2.14. How is the QD layer applied? 5.2.15. Emberion: QD-Graphene-Si broad range SWIR sensor 5.2.16. QD-on-CMOS integration examples (IMEC) 5.2.17. Challenges for QD-Si technology for SWIR imaging. 5.2.18. QD-on-CMOS sensors ongoing technical challenges 5.2.19. Comparing SWIR image sensors technologies 5.2.20. Technology readiness level snapshot of printed image sensors 5.2.21. SWOT: Hybrid SWIR image sensors 5.2.22. Company profiles: SWIR imaging with hybrid sensors 5.3. Integrated antenna (including for radar) 5.3.1. Transparent electronics for ADAS radar 5.3.2. Radar integrated into headlights 5.3.3. Radar integrated into headlights (continued) 5.3.4. SWOT: Integrated antennas with printed electronics 5.3.5. Company profiles: Integrated antennas 5.4. Exterior lighting 5.4.1. Opportunities for printed/flexible electronics in exterior automotive lighting 5.4.2. OLED lighting 5.4.3. Commercializing OLED lighting is more challenging than OLED displays 5.4.4. OLED taillights commercialized 5.4.5. Comparing OLED and LED lighting 5.4.6. Konica Minolta develops R2R line 5.4.7. Mini-LEDs on flexible substrates for automotive lighting. 5.4.8. Flexbright mount LEDs on flexible substrates for bus/tram destination boards. 5.4.9. Lighting for autonomous car-to-person communication 5.4.10. SWOT: Flexible/printed exterior lighting 5.4.11. Company profiles: Exterior lighting 5.4.12. Transparent heaters for exterior lighting / sensors / windows 5.5. Transparent heaters for exterior lighting/sensors/windows 5.5.1. Automotive de-foggers are an established business 5.5.2. Printing on polycarbonate car windows. 5.5.3. Printed on-glass heater: digital printing comes of age? 5.5.4. Key suppliers for rear window defoggers 5.5.5. Growing need for 3D shaped transparent heater in automotive 5.5.6. Direct heating of headlamp plastic covers 5.5.7. Laser transfer printing as a new process for vehicle glass printing 5.5.8. Metal mesh transparent conductors as replacement for printed heaters? 5.5.9. Chasm: Transparent heaters with silver nanowires/CNTs 5.5.10. Carbon nanotube transparent conductors as replacement for printed heaters? 5.5.11. SWOT: Transparent heaters for exterior lighting / sensors / windows 5.5.12. Company profiles: Transparent exterior heaters 5.6. Printed/flexible photovoltaics 5.6.1. Where are printed/flexible photovoltaics envisaged in cars? 5.6.2. Webasto: Semi-transparent solar PV roof 5.6.3. Lightyear: Long range solar electric vehicle 5.6.4. Toyota develop solar powered car 5.6.5. Hyundai introduces silicon solar panels on roofs. 5.6.6. Sono Motors develop solar powered car 5.6.7. Tandem silicon-perovskite solar cells increase efficiency 5.6.8. Challenges in the adoption of PV in automotive applications 5.6.9. Company profiles: PV in automotive applications 5.7. Summary: Printed/flexible electronics in vehicle exteriors 5.7.1. Summary: Exterior 5.7.2. Technological/commercial readiness level of printed/flexible electronics in vehicle exteriors 5.7.3. Forecast: Exterior applications of printed/flexible electronics



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